Here are three of the weirdest oddities at SEC schools

(AP Photo/Rob Carr)

(AP Photo/Rob Carr)

There’s nothing better than standing in a packed stadium on a Saturday watching some college football, but that could all change real quick if bats starts flying right above your head.

Yes, you read that correctly a bat.

ESPN did a fascinating piece on eight odd features of college football stadiums across the country, and three of them exist in the SEC.

Let’s start with the bats. When Texas A&M’s Kyle Field opened in 1927, thousands of bats lived in the upper decks of the stadium, according to ESPN.com’s Sam Khan. An estimated 250,000 bats lived in the crevices of Kyle Field, and the stadium made fans well aware with “bat-friendly” signs posted around the old stadium.

Kyle Field has undergone a complete renovation over the past two seasons, and there supposedly won’t be as many bats around, but the ESPN article doesn’t say there will be NO bats. It simply says, “there won’t be nearly as many as before.”

In horror movies where there are bats there is usually a cemetery. That’s not the case at Alabama’s football stadium. per ESPN’s Alex Scarborough. There are no bats, but there is a cemetery.

Evergreen cemetery is located right across the street from Bryant-Denny Stadium, which thousands of fans see any given Saturday. However, there are no former Alabama players that have been buried there. If there were, they would probably be rolling over in their graves following a Crimson Tide loss.

Tennessee’s Neyland Stadium also deals with skeletons, except the Vols have them housed inside the actual facility, according to ESPN’s David Hale. The university’s Anthropology Department is housed inside Neyland Stadium where more than 1,000 skeletons are housed.

These three teams are all known for their excellent stadiums, but don’t take a wrong turn. Who knows what you will run into?


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